"Moving Through Space Toward You"  - A celebration of the theremin, hosted by Starlee Kine

"Moving Through Space Toward You" - A celebration of the theremin

hosted by Starlee Kine

Califone, Eban Schletter, Probyn Gregory, Sean Michaels

Wed, July 23, 2014

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

Seat assignments begin at 6:00PM, Doors open for drinks at 7:00PM, Showtime at 8:30PM | When you arrive at Will Call on the night of the show, seats will be assigned first come first served, from the front of the theatre to the back. If you want to sit closer, be sure to come earlier. | NO LATE ENTRY * NO REFUNDS * NO EXCHANGES

"Moving Through Space Toward You" - A celebration of the theremin
"Moving Through Space Toward You"  - A celebration of the theremin
95 years after the invention of the strangest and most beautiful musical instrument in the world, Los Angeles will be filling a room with its singing. This is an intimate evening in celebration of the theremin - a spectral instrument that is played without touching, as if it's the mesmerizing song of the air itself. In the right hands, the theremin sounds like an electric charge, like a whizzing UFO, like a perfect human voice. Hailed in the 1920s as the future of music, the destroyer of orchestras. Though it paved the way for the modern synthesizer, theremins today are museum oddities and sound-effect machines; virtuosos are rarer than diamonds.
But on July 23rd, Largo will host two: Probyn Gregory ( The Beach Boys) and Eben Schletter, uniting their powers to recount the tale of Lev Termen, the extraordinary Russian scientist and spy who invented the theremin. The occasion is the U.S. launch of Us Conductors, Sean Michaels' acclaimed debut novel, which tells the story of Lev and Clara Rockmore, the greatest thereminist of all time. Michaels, founder of one of the first music blogs Said the Gramophone, is travelling to California from Montreal; here, alongside our very special host Starlee Kine, they will tell a version of the theremin's story - reaching from Jazz Age dance-halls to the Siberian tundra, painting a picture of science, longing and love.

With the theremin’s clear relationship of movement, gest and sound reaction, one of Lev’s last inventions while living in the U.S. was the terpsitone where a dancer creates music by the movements of her body on a small platform. “The dancers dancing in tune,” as well as time with be the theme of Califone’s live debut score to a very special 1917 Russian film at the end of the evening.

"Moving Through Space Toward You" is presented in partnership with LA's Skylight Books and publisher Tin House Books.
hosted by Starlee Kine
hosted by Starlee Kine
A contributor to This American Life and writer for the New York Times, one of her favorite moments of radio that she ever recorded was in response to a newspaper ad from a 77 year old ex factory worker which simply said he wanted to "be granted an opportunity to amaze.” By playing his theremin for you. She’s also: designed a cutting board for chopping onions on while heartbroken; written the saddest cartoon you’ll ever see about tattoos; dispensed anonymous advice to subway and bus riders; been one half of Starlee and Arthur Review, the first animated series (probably) done on Post-It Notes. She misses Breaking Bad so much that she made the pilot episode into a mug.
Califone
Califone
Califone is a critically-acclaimed experimental folk band from Chicago. The band is named after Califone International, a long-standing manufacturer of audio equipment commonly found in schools, libraries and businesses. Califone is the musical project of former Red Red Meat frontman Tim Rutili. Their music is less rooted in blues-rock than Red Red Meat and is more directly inspired by experimental music and early american folk music as can be found on Harry Smith’s Anthology of American Folk Music. Tim Rutili has collaborated with a number of other artists as well. He joined up with Modest Mouse frontman Isaac Brock and others in 2002 to release the album Sharpen Your Teeth under the band name Ugly Casanova. Most recently, Tim directed the film and created the soundtrack to All My Friends are Funeral Singers which was adored at Sundance, and recently released the album Stitches on Dead Ocean Records where brass, pedal steel, and strings color in the edges of some songs and gritty electronics, the mesmerizing thrumming of tablas, and eerie keyboards also pepper the newly recorded tracks. A cartographer could spend lifetimes mapping the terrain of Stitches.
Eban Schletter
Eban Schletter
Eban Schletter is a prolific composer and songwriter who has written music for countless television shows including Spongebob Squarepants, Mr. Show with Bob and David and the Academy Awards. His feature film scores include the 2005 remake of The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and New Line Cinema’s Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd. He has also maintained a steady output of solo albums which explore a broad range of musical genres. A multi-instrumentalist, Eban has performed on keyboards, drums, bass, clarinet and other instruments with a variety of artists, but it is his abilities on the Theremin which he is fast becoming recognized for. His podcast Fantastical Musicorium has been receiving much attention as of late, presenting an eclectic array of original music and more.
Probyn Gregory
Probyn Gregory
Probyn Gregory is a composer and musician who was raised in the disparate climates of New Hampshire and California, and is now based in Los Angeles. For many years, he has been a member of the Brian Wilson Band (2005 Grammy award), and has performed/recorded[1] with Wondermints, Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Billy Joel, Badly Drawn Boy, Andrew Gold (Byrds Of A Feather), Eels, Arthur Lee and Love, Riviera, Probyn brings a hidden musical element to the Brian Wilson Band that is not unlike what Al Jardine brought to The Beach Boys. He plays guitar, bass, banjo, keyboards, trumpet, French horn, Flügelhorn, various lower brass instruments, and the tannerin (a theremin emulator, featured on "Good Vibrations".)
Sean Michaels
Michaels' debut novel, published this summer, has been hailed by Bookriot and the American Booksellers Association as one of the most exciting debuts of 2014. "[It is] a novel that somehow manages to feel both classically Russian (with echoes of Dostoyevsky and Solzhenitsyn) and very contemporary," Kirkus wrote in their starred review. "[It] transcend[s] the dusty contrivances of much historical fiction, resulting in a novel that feels both fresh and timeless." And Sean's recent Canadian and east-coast tour attracted coverage from All Things Considered, the Philadelphia Inquirer, CBC, Vice, Creative Loafing, WAMU, WYPR, Dig Boston, Lit Reactor, Hazlitt, Asheville Indy Week, the National Post, the Globe & Mail, the Vancouver Sun and even Nardwuar the Human Serviette. A long-time writer and music critic, Sean's work has been published by The Guardian, McSweeney's, The Walrus, The Observer, Rolling Stone, Pitchfork and HTML Giant. He founded Said the Gramophone - credited with "breaking" artists including Arcade Fire, Tune-Yards, Beirut and Feist - in 2003.
Venue Information:
Largo at the Coronet
366 N La Cienega Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90048
http://www.largo-la.com